submit news    HOME | FEEDBACK  


« NAVIGATION »
NEWS

- Bio/Medicine

- Chemicals

- Defense

- Drug Delivery

- Education

- Electronics

- Energy

- Events

- Grants

- Industry

- Investment

- Litigation

- Materials

- MEMS

- Nanofabrication

- Nanoparticles

- Nanotubes

- Optics

- Partnership

- Patent

- Products

- Quantum dots

- Research

- Smart Dust

- Software
COMPANIES
EVENTS

- Browse by Month

- Current Shows

- Previous Shows

- Submit Events
FEEDBACK
ADVERTISE
LINK TO US

« PARTNERS »
Become A Nanotechwire Partner

FEI Company

Veeco Instruments

Nano Science and Technology Institute

National Nanotechnology Initiative

Nanotechnology at Zyvex

Want to see your Company or Organization listed above? Become A Nanotechwire Partner Today - click here
« NEWSLETTER »



« SEARCH »







4/12/2009 10:58:34 PM
New Photolithography Technique Advances Nanofabrication Process

The ability to create tiny patterns is essential to the fabrication of computer chips as well as to many other current and potential applications of nanotechnology. Yet, creating ever smaller features, through a process called photolithography, has required the use of ultraviolet light, which is difficult and expensive to work with. John Fourkas, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry in the University of Maryland College of Chemical and Life Sciences, and his research group have developed a new, table-top technique called RAPID (Resolution Augmentation through Photo-Induced Deactivation) lithography that makes it possible to create small features without the use of ultraviolet light. This research is to be published in Science magazine and released on Science Express on April 9, 2009.

Photolithography uses light to deposit or remove material and create patterns on a surface. There is usually a direct relationship between the wavelength of light used and the feature size created. Therefore, nanofabrication has depended on short wavelength ultraviolet light to generate ever smaller features.

“The RAPID lithography technique we have developed enables us to create patterns twenty times smaller than the wavelength of light employed,” explains Dr. Fourkas, “which means that it streamlines the nanofabrication process. We expect RAPID to find many applications in areas such as electronics, optics, and biomedical devices.”

“If you have gotten a filling at the dentist in recent years,” says Fourkas, “you have seen that a viscous liquid is squirted into the cavity and a blue light is then used to harden it. A similar process of hardening using light is the first element of RAPID. Now imagine that your dentist could use a second light source to sculpt the filling by preventing it from hardening in certain places. We have developed a way of using a second light source to perform this sculpting, and it allows us to create features that are 2500 times smaller than the width of a human hair.” Both of the laser light sources used by Fourkas and his team were of the same color, the only difference being that the laser used to harden the material produced short bursts of light while the laser used to prevent hardening was on constantly. The second laser beam also passed through a special optic that allowed for sculpting of the hardened features in the desired shape.

“The fact that one laser is on constantly in RAPID makes this technique particularly easy to implement,” says Fourkas, “because there is no need to control the timing between two different pulsed lasers.”

Fourkas and his team are currently working on improvements to RAPID lithography that they believe will make it possible to create features that are half of the size of the ones they have demonstrated to date.

Achieving lambda/20 Resolution by One-Color Initiation and Deactivation of Polymerization was written by Linjie Li, Rafael R. Gattass, Erez Gershgorem, Hana Hwang and John T. Fourkas.

Other Headlines from University of Maryland ...
 - The First Non-Trivial Atom Circuit: Progress towards an Atom SQUID
 - Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences Joins Maryland International Incubator
 - Smith School MBAs Secure Lockheed Martin Investment in UMD Technology in First Semester of Dingman Center for Entrepreneurship Program
 - UMD Advance Lights Possible Path to Creating Next Gen Computer Chips
 - $5.1 Million Army-Md. Alliance Speeds University Research to Market

More Nanofabrication Headlines ...
 - Optical Legos: building nanoshell structures
 - Water droplets direct self-assembly process in thin-film materials
 - Berkeley Researchers Find New Route to Nano Self-Assembly
 - Flat bacteria in nanoslits
 - Yale Engineers Revolutionize Nano-device Fabrication Using Amorphous Metals


« Back To List »

« GET LISTED »
- submit company
- submit news
- submit events
- advertise here

« EVENTS »
- More Events


Copyright © 2017 Nanotechwire.com | Privacy Policy |