submit news    HOME | FEEDBACK  


« NAVIGATION »
NEWS

- Bio/Medicine

- Chemicals

- Defense

- Drug Delivery

- Education

- Electronics

- Energy

- Events

- Grants

- Industry

- Investment

- Litigation

- Materials

- MEMS

- Nanofabrication

- Nanoparticles

- Nanotubes

- Optics

- Partnership

- Patent

- Products

- Quantum dots

- Research

- Smart Dust

- Software
COMPANIES
EVENTS

- Browse by Month

- Current Shows

- Previous Shows

- Submit Events
FEEDBACK
ADVERTISE
LINK TO US

« PARTNERS »
Become A Nanotechwire Partner

FEI Company

Veeco Instruments

Nano Science and Technology Institute

National Nanotechnology Initiative

Nanotechnology at Zyvex

Want to see your Company or Organization listed above? Become A Nanotechwire Partner Today - click here
« NEWSLETTER »



« SEARCH »







10/23/2009 6:25:13 PM
Researchers can precisely manipulate polarization in nanostructures

Researchers from the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Twente, working with American researchers, have succeeded in using an electrical signal to control both the elastic and the magnetic properties of a nanomaterial at a very localized level. This opens up new possibilities for data storage with very high data densities. Their findings are to be published in November in the leading scientific journal Nature Nanotechnology.

In what are known as 'multiferroic' materials, the electrical, magnetic and elastic properties of the material are coupled. These materials make it possible to create new, complex structures that are suitable for e.g. data storage. Until recently, nobody had succeeded in controlling these multiferroic properties, but researchers from Oakridge National Laboratory (USA), the University of California, Berkeley (USA), Pennsylvania State University (USA) and the University of Twente's MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology demonstrate in the next issue of Nature Nanotechnology that it is indeed possible.

In their experiments, the scientists succeeded in manipulating a nanostructure made of bismuth ferrate (BiFeO3) in an ordered way using scanning probe microscopy. This is a technique in which a surface can be manipulated at the atomic scale, using a miniscule needle.

By applying an electrical voltage to the needle and moving it over the surface of the material, the scientists are able to 'charge' a nanomaterial with different elastic and magnetic properties at a very localized level. This opens new avenues for data storage with very high information densities.

The article 'Deterministic control of ferroelastic switching in multiferroic materials' by N. Balke, S. Jesse, A. P. Baddorf, S. V. Kalinin (ORNL), Y. H. Chu, R. Ramesh (UC Berkeley), S. Choudhury and L. Q. Chen (Penn State) and M. Huijben (MESA+) will appear in the November issue of Nature Nanotechnology.

Other Headlines from University of Twente ...
 - Electrons seem heavier in extremely thin silicon
 - Gold particles against cancer
 - Making music on a microscopic scale
 - MoU between California NanoSystems Institute, UCLA and MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, UT
 - "Molecular roller coaster" can distinguish between molecules

More Electronics Headlines ...
 - Nanosys Unlocks Full Color LCD Viewing Experience with Nanotechnology
 - NUS and A*STAR Launch Research Programmes in New Growth Area of Green Electronics
 - Full-Color Quantum Dot LED (QLED) Displays Move Closer to Reality, as QD Vision Achieves Significant Efficiency and Performance Improvements
 - "Computer synapse" analyzed at the nanoscale
 - Pentagonal tiles pave the way towards organic electronics


« Back To List »

« GET LISTED »
- submit company
- submit news
- submit events
- advertise here

« EVENTS »
- More Events


Copyright 2014 Nanotechwire.com | Privacy Policy |