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NEWS:

Tuesday, October 30, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
MIT's 'electronic nose' could detect hazards
A tiny "electronic nose" that MIT researchers have engineered with a novel inkjet printing method could be used to detect hazards including carbon monoxide, harmful industrial solvents and explosives

Tuesday, October 30, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
Purdue creating wireless sensors to monitor bearings in jet engines
Researchers at Purdue University, working with the U.S. Air Force, have developed tiny wireless sensors resilient enough to survive the harsh conditions inside jet engines to detect when critical bearings are close to failing and prevent breakdowns.

Tuesday, October 30, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
Speed plays crucial role in breaking protein's H-bonds
This work could have vast implications in bioengineering and medical research by advancing our understanding of the relationship between structure and function in these basic building blocks of life.

Tuesday, October 30, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
Evolution in the Nanoworld
This week, scientists publish images resolving molecules which have organized themselves into patterns according to size.

Tuesday, October 30, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
New system would use rotating magnetic field to detect pathogens
Researchers at Purdue and Duke universities have developed a technique that uses a magnetic field to selectively separate tiny magnetic particles, representing a highly sensitive method for potentially diagnosing disease by testing samples from patients.

Tuesday, October 30, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
New Magnetic Separation Tecnhique Might Detect Multiple Pathogens At Once
The method could lead to new technologies for medical or environmental testing

Monday, October 29, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
Video shows buckyballs form by 'shrink wrapping'
Experiments, simulations reveal birth secret of tiny carbon spheres

Saturday, October 27, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
NIST Demos Industrial-Grade Nanowire Device Fabrication
In the growing catalog of nanoscale technologies, nanowires—tiny rows of conductor or semiconductor atoms—have attracted a great deal of interest for their potential to build unique atomic-scale electronics.

Saturday, October 27, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
University of Delaware researchers race ahead with latest spintronics achievement
The finding confirms that silicon--the workhorse material of present-day electronics--now can be harnessed up for new-age spintronics applications.

Tuesday, October 23, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
Platinum-Rich Shell, Platinum-Poor Core
New class of catalyst for fuel cells beats pure platinum by a mile

Tuesday, October 23, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
Harvard University engineers demonstrate quantum cascade laser nanoantenna
New laser could lead to ultrahigh resolution microscopes for chemical imaging in biology and medicine

Monday, October 22, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
Nanoparticles Yield Safer Light-Activated Cancer Therapy
Using modified silica nanoparticles, a team of investigators at the State University of New York, Buffalo, has developed a photosensitizer delivery method that has the potential to target tumor cells specifically.

Monday, October 22, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
Photonic Gel Films Hold Promise
By alternating layers of two different polymers - one rigid and glassy, the other soft and easily swollen with liquid or vapor - researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) report they've created photonic gel crystals that can be tuned to reflect light of many different colors across the visible and near-infrared spectrum.

Monday, October 22, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
Nanowire generates its own electricity
Microscopic wire has photovoltaic properties

Thursday, October 18, 2007 | Research | 0 comments
Getting Light to Bend Backwards
Uniquely sandwiched materials coax light to defy nature and skirt the laws of refraction

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