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NEWS:

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Partnership | 0 comments
Synopsys and SMIC Team to Deliver Proven SoC Design Solution for 65-nm to 40-nm Process Nodes
Based on collaboration agreements for 65-nm and 40-nm, SMIC has selected Synopsys as the primary supplier for design implementation software and IP solutions consisting of digital controllers, PHYs and analog IP.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Electronics | 0 comments
"Chaogates" hold promise for the semiconductor industry
In a move that holds great significance for the semiconductor industry, a team of researchers has created an alternative to conventional logic gates, demonstrated them in silicon, and dubbed them chaogates. The researchers present their findings in Chaos, a journal published by the American Institute of Physics.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Research | 0 comments
Shortest-pulse X-ray beams could illuminate atomic, molecular interactions
Ultra-short X-ray beams produced at the University of Michigan could one day serve as more sensitive medical diagnostic tools, and they could work like strobe lights to allow researchers to observe chemical reactions that happen in quadrillionths of a second.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Energy | 0 comments
Molecular "stencils" open up new possibilities for solar energy
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have begun to use molecular “stencils” to pave the way to new materials that could potentially find their way into future generations of solar cells, catalysts and photonic crystals.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Energy | 0 comments
A New Twist for Nanopillar Light Collectors
High costs have been a major deterrant to the large-scale applications of silicon-based solar cells. Nanopillars – densely packed nanoscale arrays of optically active semiconductors – have shown potential for providing a next generation of relatively cheap and scalable solar cells, but have been hampered by efficiency issues.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Nanotubes | 0 comments
An Anticipatory Governance Approach to Carbon Nanotubes
While offering great promise in a host of new applications, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) could be harmful to humans and a new risk review suggests that product designers and others should provisionally treat CNTs “as if” they are hazardous.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Research | 0 comments
Artificial black holes made with metamaterials
While our direct knowledge of black holes in the universe is limited to what we can observe from thousands or millions of light years away, a team of Chinese physicists has proposed a simple way to design an artificial electromagnetic (EM) black hole in the laboratory.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Education | 0 comments
UAlbany NanoCollege Hosts more than 300 Elementary, Middle- and High-School Students for NanoCareer Day
More than 300 elementary, middle- and high-school students from throughout Tech Valley received a firsthand look at careers in the emerging field of nanotechnology when they visited the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering ("CNSE") of the University at Albany for NanoCareer Day on November 15.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Partnership | 0 comments
UAlbany NanoCollege Establishes its First Global Education and Research Partnerships in the Pacific Rim
Collaborations involve three of Japan's leading educational and technological institutions

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Drug Delivery | 0 comments
Cancer cure a driving force for awarded chemical engineer
Chemical Engineer working at UQ's Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology to develop nanoporous materials which will help with targeted drug delivery.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Grants | 0 comments
NanoEngineers Aim to Grow Tissues with Functional Blood Vessels
University of California, San Diego NanoEngineers won a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop the tools to manufacture biodegradable frames around which heart tissues – functional blood vessels included – will grow.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Research | 0 comments
Microsensors offer first look at whether cell mass affects growth rate
University of Illinois researchers are using a new kind of microsensor to answer one of the weightiest questions in biology – the relationship between cell mass and growth rate.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Electronics | 0 comments
Imaging tool may aid nanoelectronics by screening tiny tubes
Researchers have demonstrated a new imaging tool for rapidly screening structures called single-wall carbon nanotubes, possibly hastening their use in creating a new class of computers and electronics that are faster and consume less power than today's.

Tuesday, November 16, 2010 | Grants | 0 comments
Keystone Nano Awarded Qualifying Therapeutic Discovery Project
The National Institutes of Health and the IRS have granted Keystone Nano a Qualifying Therapeutic Discovery Project Award that provides funding to further develop the company’s nanoparticles technology for the enhanced treatment of cancer.

Monday, November 15, 2010 | Industry | 0 comments
Ultra Mixing and Processing Facility (UMPF) choose CPS Disc Centrifuge to aid fluid processing research at the nanoscale
Analytik are pleased to announce that the Ultra Mixing and Processing Facility (UMPF) based at the University of Liverpool has selected the DC24000 Disc Centrifuge from CPS instruments Europe to further support their development of industrial scale processing tools for nanotechnology products.

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